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20100101
20100131
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CSPAN2 18
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 4:00pm EST
: in america. . . this being coming up next, booktv presents after words, an hourlong program where we invite guest hosts to interview authors. this week long time talk radio program brian jennings discusses his latest book, "censorship" the threat to silence talk radio. mr. jennings explained what he believes will be the backdoor path to reinstating the fairness doctrine and silencing conservative talk radio. mr. jennings discusses his book with a nationally syndicated talk show host, monica crowley. >> host: i am monica crowley, the host of a nationally syndicated radio program "the monica crowley show." i'm also a panelist on the mcglaughlin group and a political and foreign affairs analyst for the fox news channel. i am delighted to welcome to the program today brian jennings. brian is one of the nation's top talk radio programmers. he served more than a decade as a national vice president of top programming for citadel broadcasting. he is an authority on talk radio. everybody in the industry knows him and respected and widely and according to talkers magazine he is one of the founding fa
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 3:00pm EST
discovery of america. and we discovered america for ourselves. we knew about america, but what we knew, america very different. we knew something that we learn from the 19th century america. and then this new world and we tried to find out how books, i found this book very interesting, but i just wanted detail of this book of the story, but from that aside, my first wish, was what you wrote this book. 50 years ago, visit from one leader of one country to the united states. i think there may be other leaders came here. sometimes khrushchev was eccentric. and president yeltsin was more eccentric, and when khrushchev came here, he just showed the time like this contemporary politician that we prefer to go to the common show, because most of the young people interest in this, maybe it was part of this. my father's behavior. maybe it was because it was back through the old war mentality on both sides, but not eliminate at that time in one visit, but it would change so why you wrote this? >> guest: i wrote the book because i happen to stumble upon the story of your father, nikita khrushchev'
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 12:00pm EST
occupation of cuba territory. most of latin america history have some knowledge of castro's hostility towards the base. but what is generally not known is that from the early 1900s to the present, guantanamo has also been a sight for diplomatic accommodation, compromise, and cooperation. the terms dictated by the platt amendment only stated that the united states would buy or lease naval or station, buy or lease them. in cuba. it did not specify a number of such stations, nor their locations. that was a matter of negotiated compromise between the cuban president and theodore rooseve roosevelt, that the united states would obtain really only one major naval station and that would be guantanamo, not havana. now, obviously, the united states has always had the upper hand in these negotiations. when i say diplomatic compromise, i'm not suggesting that the two parties started on a level playing field. that certainly would not be the case. the second major compromise occurred in 1934 when the united states abrogated the platt amendment, which had become an increasingly unpopular with the various se
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 6:00pm EST
a dream" there are three places king terms from kennedy and white america and talks to something i must say to my people. he integrates that in the middle. so i have come here to selma because my people are suffering. i have come here to help you sing come by here my lord, somebody is suffering and that is why i have come to selma. now, if i can find the pages i'm going to quote from that are not out of order. more or less managers think. king's since of communion in the meetings was an only to lift up his people because a lot of what he was always doing was elevating his people into the biblical narrative. he put an end to the crucifixion. this is the cross we bear for our people. or he was putting them to exodus or the other stories of testament delivers but sometimes it was the indignant king and this indignant king when he seized with racism was an angry black preacher. and he would say it is the black man who produced the wealth of the nation. and if the nation doesn't have enough sense to share its wealth and power with the very people who made it so. and i know what i'm talking a
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 5:00pm EST
and that is fine. but, believe me, if we lose any free-speech rights in america through reregulation in the public interest to the fcc, liberals are going to lose those rights as well. .. >> this is about protecting the first amendment, our bill of rights and our constitution. brian jennings, thank you so much for joining me. >> thank you so much. >> the book is called "censorship," the author is brian jennings. i'm monica crowley, thank you so much for being with us today. ♪ >> coming up next, booktv presents, "after words," an hour-long interview program where we invite the -- a guest host to interview the author of a new book. born walker smith jr., the future title holder spent his formative years in harlem and mixed his career with the happening of the renaissance. shiewger ray's connections to langston hughes and lena horne, a generation of african-americans who found success during the start of a prodder civil rights movement -- broader civil rights movement. wil haygood discusses his book is dave zirin, author of "a people's history of sports in the united states." >> host: welcome to "a
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 12:00pm EST
as non-fiction. he is to me and to many americans america's greatest storyteller in history. he has been enormously successful. the winner of major awards for his books and for his lifetime devotion to american history. .. >> you have produced over the years and novels such as liberty tavern that came down 1977 just to remind you of fabric of the difficulties in the book of life during the american revolution. still lives that came out in 1981 about three west point soldiers and their wives about the resignation of the officers' wives that they would be for the rest of their lives so he has told a wonderful story. the lives of our -- "the intimate lives of the founding fathers" this book, end this incredible book just published within the last couple of weeks the influence of women in the shaping of our history, with men who were the mothers, wives, daughters, a nd friends of the founding fathers, washington, frankli n, adams, a hamilton, jefferson, madison , a very different women. enormously interesting providing material for the rebidding stories of the founders as we mentioned before
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 10:00pm EST
books, fiction as well as non-fiction. he is to me and many americans america's greatest storyteller. he's been enormously successful, the winner of major awards for his books and his lifetime devotion to american history. i think we could spend the entire evening here all the time we have allotted just reviewing the numerous books and articles tom has written works on franklin, washington, jefferson, truman, fdr, american war, hamilton byrd will, the outstanding volume he produced to accompany a major 1997 pbs production liberty. of course the recent perils of peace which deals with the events after the surrender of the british at yorktown in 1781. a great personal memoir of your upbringing in jersey city which as you know is my home town as well so we have that in common. and so much more on the american revolution, the great leadership of george washington and his military struggles to achieve american independence and now the subject of tonight's conversation, the role of women in american history. we see this in fiction and nonfiction that you have produced over the years in the nov
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2010 12:00am EST
in america. and they've called it a washington love letter. and nobody could believe that it was real at first. and then people who know a little bit about washington's life and stuff, there were some very atchison diaries published. they discovered he had written it better for month after he had become engaged to moffit custis, who was in for the the richest widow in virginia. and this caused consternation in 1877. they couldn't believe that george washington could possibly have thought for another woman. and so, it was like a suspense story as a probe to find out what happened to this letter. and it turned out that the latter never saw the light of day. it was going to be auctioned off of the mystery man body and this appeared for 60 years. and they founded by sheer accident in the files of a harvard library. so when i saw all this, i said to myself, this is a book i was born to write. i've got to write this book. i've got to explain this and then i begin to realize there would be other things to discover about the other founding fathers. post goes as a result of all the research yo
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 9:00pm EST
critics of american democracy. he describes america as the biggest purveyor of violence in the world by 1967. and we have to take note that his riverside speech, april 4th 1967 when he first comes out against the vietnam war mike in a very robust public way is given one year to date before he is assassinated in memphis. when we think about king between 1965 to 60 even two years before river site by the time king is going to chicago and he's in chicago to try to transform the slums he talks about islam clarence campaign and desegregate housing in chicago. he's talking about poverty. he's talking about economic marginalization of poor people, laborers. king makes a very famous speech where he talks about labour has dignity which is one of his last speech in 1968. king's poor people campaign is something that we shunt aside as well. we really keep dr. king frozen on august 28th 1963 with the i have a dream speech in his washington, d.c. and we don't think about the king who was much more combative even though he was non-violent because he believed he could use of violence as a moral and
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 12:00am EST
will be the most eloquent radical critic of america and democracy during the postwar period. the outcome is also a bold enough for not acting proactively enough but what is interesting study about the backs she really day she really serves as the counterpart in a way that people don't think of. they think of him as a counterpart for the a good black man and malcolm is the nasty anti-white. no. saying things that king cannot say it a very confrontational manner but keira is king room to negotiate and not just came but wilkins from the naacp and urban league to negotiate. people look at malcolm as being so extreme because of the robust criticism but also against the politics of white supremacy give sees other civil-rights leaders room to maneuver. but the quote that you take that malcolm had a great gift to "superfreakonomics" ordinary people. the genius writer of the '60s and '70s have often said that malcolm had such a love for people he spoke in a language they understood. and one way that ♪ ♪ could be effectively communicate is he was from the black working-class. and handing out with hust
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 6:00am EST
system in america. mr. baucus: mr. president, i've got to address that one. my colleagues want to speak. i think it's worth repeating over and over and over again. this legislation is designed to retain uniquely american solution to health care, roughly half public, half private. it's designed to make sure that patients can still as they should, choose that your own doctor and doctor they want, primary doc specialist, no gatekeeper and that sort of stuff. the doctor able to make their own decisions in consultation with their patients, d doc-patient, and in addition to that, frankly, more competition with the exchanges. this legislation, frankly, is -- is rooted almost entirely on -- maintain the current free market system in health care. there is an insurance market reform, which i think everybody agrees with and is denying preexisting conditions for denying coverage. and there is a modest expansion of medicaid, lower-income people that otherwise can't get health care. but otherwise this is legislation rooted in the current american system. we've got a good system that works and this is
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 10:00pm EST
baseball team and football fans across america may have lost the voice, they will never forget it and as the tribute continues on, the impact of harry callus, the broadcaster and the person will never subside. >> in a world away, two nfl players on a humanitarian mission literally save a little girl's life. >> i couldn't believe what was happening. >> you will hear the inspiring l of their lives. >> one story inspired all of us to do better. what started out as a humanitarian mission to africa for two nfl play earths from the chicago bears ended up in a life saving mission. from sports net chicago, here is dan higgins with the story we called gridiron guardian. >> i think god has put people in the right time and place for things like this situation like this. we didn't pass the buck. >> two defensive line men and two teammates united in a goal to establish nfl supremacy. away from football there's another purpose that unites them. in a place a world away from soldier feel. >> during the off season the two bears were joined by teammate tommy harris on a special trip to nigeria f
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 10:00pm EST
is one of the utmost critics of american democracy. he describes america as the biggest purveyor of violence in the world by 1967. we have to take note that his riverside speeds, april 4th 1967 in new york city when he first comes out against the vietnam war in a very robust public day is one year to the day before he is assassinated. when we think about king, by the time king is going to chicago. he is in chicago to try to transform the slums. he talked about a slum clearance campaign. he is talking about poverty. he is talking about economic marginal losses in a poor people. laborers. king makes a very famous speech where he talked about all labor has dignity, which is one of his last speech is. kingsport people campaign is something that we shot aside as well. we've really keep dr. king frozen on august 20th, 1963, with the "i have a dream" speech right here in washington, d.c. and we don't think about the king who was really much more combative, even though he was non-violent. king believed that you could use non-violence as a moral and political force, really a battering ram
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 11:00am EST
america." can you tell me about your books because it's a compilation of african-american letters, spanning from the 1700s to 2008, and what i try to do is present a multidimensional portrait of black life through their own letters. so it includes the letters of extraordinary people who, many have heard of, like doctor martin luther king, benjamin becker and ida b. wells. but also unsung people, slaves, just ordinary people throughout history. can you give an example of one of these unsung people? >> sure. there are many, several letters from slaves who are just writing to each other to family members from whom they have been separated. you know, letting them know how they are, trying to find out how their loved ones are very. not people who would have known of. >> how did you come upon this project and how did you select the letters? >> well, that was pretty insane. i went through thousands of lives over the course of five years, and some of the things naturally emerge so i wanted to look at black family life through letters, and so after a while to sort of an organizing principl
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 6:00pm EST
patient person to do the work in pakistan and afghanistan yet in america we're not so patient and expect to see results seen than we do. we get impatient. we get angry. can you talk about the patience that it's taking and can we do enough of what you're trying to accomplish quickly enough. you know, afghanistan is on the front burner today and i'm hearing from colleagues of mine over the weekend saying it's just ungovernable and it's a mess. can you accomplish what you're trying to do in a timeframe that the american people are happy with and also really bring meaningful change to afghanistan? >> as you mentioned it's paradigm. in the u.s. we're used to two minute football drills and six second kound sound bites i know you have the go and vote in a few minutes and halfway around the world things are measured in terms of not only fiscal years but in generations. i also feel having met with thousands of people. especially the elders that they feel there are good things happening. also it's been a real honor. the last two, three years to get to know people serving in the military. fairly si
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 10:00pm EST
which critiques america's response to 9/11. howard zinn died january 27, 2010 a7.t the from brandeisian diversity in massachusetts, this is an hour in five minutes. >> howard came and read here about a year-and-a-half ago for us, and not long after he read, i picked up a boo
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2010 10:00pm EST
that in a much more radical way. a new man. .. and what america means impact them still remains on settled that go back to these core things about the american founding. mo conservatism too often sees itself as merely representing and talking about economics or policy issues or certain traditions one, and i think what it didn't quite realize was that what it was trying to conserve and the larger sense with a larger principles of the american founding. it's there. that is what it stands for. but it didn't quite grasp that in a way. and as a result i think it was short-sighted move. and i think today we are seeing a different look which in the book is with a new conservatism. that doesn't see itself as merely conservative versus liberal, left versus right, republican versus democrat for that matter, but sees its larger, this larger thing. that's something very different, and i think just like the american founders in the period i described earlier that had to go through the serious rethinking of what are the core principles we stand for, what's the legitimacy of government, what is this sour
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)